Heber City Council Discussing Housing Issues In The City

Heber City Council meets Tuesday evening. Much of the council’s agenda revolves around housing issues in the city.

City Council meets in a work meeting starting at 4:00 pm on Tuesday. One early presentation revolves around Tiny Homes.

The small structures are between 150 and 400 square feet and built on wheels but could be placed in backyards.

Part of the council’s discussion will be defining the difference between an RV and a tiny home on wheels and understanding the potential benefits and drawbacks of allowing the structures in Heber City.

Additionally, during their work meeting council will discuss a Senior Living Development. The proposed development would be located at 650 South 1200 west next to the LDS Chapel. The developer Barrett Peterson of Peterson Homes plans to speak to the council about the development before moving forward in the planning process.

Finally, regular session begins at 6:00 pm. The council will consider approving an ordinance regulating short term rentals. The recommended ordinance would allow for continued single room rental and rental of an entire dwelling that is owner occupied. Vacation Rentals, meaning short term rentals of an entire dwelling that is not owner occupied would be restricted to a 20-block radius in Heber’s downtown. It also requires off-street parking for users and licensing of owners.

Read the original story at KPCW.org

Heber Valley Artisan Cheese held their 2nd annual Ice Sculptures Exhibition this weekend. Several local businesses sponsored the sculptures being displayed. There were also two different ice carving demonstrations. The event was free to the public.

The annual event began last year when Carolee Kohler saw ice sculpting on a Hallmark movie and thought it would be a fun idea for their farm. They are also considering a woodcarving event.

According to Lindsey Strother, social media and events coordinator, each sculpture takes between 1-3 hours to carve. “We contacted Amazing Ice Creations back in November, and we reached out to local companies to sponsor the ice sculptures,” she said. “Yesterday morning around 9 am, they came in a massive truck and dropped them all off for us, and we set them up.”

Along with the ice sculptures, sponsors receive a sign and canopy for the display and social media marketing. The sponsors decide what they want to have sculpted. After the event, they can take the ice sculptures and display them at their businesses. The creations normally last a couple of weeks. Some will be left in the field and can be viewed throughout the week.

The ice this year included Olaf, company logos, animals, and other items. Darron Kingston, the sculptor, has carved ice for over 10 years with his dad. According to Kingston, “I like sculptures that give me a challenge. Here, for example, my favorite was the lumberjack.” One of his favorite past creations was a 9-foot bear.

Grant Kohler, owner of Heber Valley Artisan Cheese, explained, “We decided to do something that was free and something that people could just get out and come and enjoy. Especially this year with Covid, it seems like Januarys are slow months. People are looking for things to be able to get outside and do.” He continued, “Businesses pay in and buy the sculptures, we have them sculpted, and then we just let people come and enjoy them.” Kohler estimated around 3,000 to 4,000 people will stop by the event.

The dairy farm also offers cheese-making classes and tours of their new robotic barn. “The tours are everyday except Sunday,” according to Kohler. “People hayride over, intermingle with the cows, see the barn and amenities, and watch the cows be milked. The cows will literally go get milked on their own.” Tickets for the tours and other events are available on the Heber Valley Artisan Cheese website: https://hebervalleyartisancheese.com/.