Heber City Council Approves Grant Agreement To Fund Airport Master Plan Update

Heber City Council approved a grant agreement to fund the Airport Master Plan update at Tuesday’s city council.

The Heber Airport Master Plan will be updated for the first time since 2003 in the coming months. The update will fulfill grant assurances the city made to the Federal Aviation Administration which subsidizes the costs of operation at the airport. Without the master plan update the city would be required to pay for upkeep of the airport on their own. The master plan update will be managed by Heber City Manager Matt Brower, Airport Engineer Jeremy McAlister and Airport Manager Travis Biggs. Biggs presented to the council at the September 3rd council meeting regarding what the update will entail.

“Going to take 18 to 24 months is what we’re anticipating,” Biggs continued. “The airport, the city, and the engineers will be kind of spearheading it; with help from the Community Advisory Committee and the Technical Advisory Committee.”

The Community Advisory Committee will provide the Airport Master Plan update with a voice for the community as a whole as different elements and impacts are considered.

Members of the committee includes Heber City Council members Wayne Hardman and Heidi Franco as well as Wasatch County Council members Steve Farrell and Marilyn Crittenden and Stephanie Grady representing Daniels town. Airport Advisory Board members Kerri McFee, Bart Mounteer and Jason Talley are also on the committee. Heber City Manager Matt Brower noted that they still need a few more recommendations from council to fill out the list of 10-15 committee members.

“There is a representative we’re looking for from Midway still, from Charleston, from the local airport committee or I should say (Users and Tennent’s Association) we have two at large members,” Brower explained. “So, we’re looking to council right now to see if we can’t make sure we round out this committee.”

Names suggested by the council included former airport advisory board members Tom Melville and Ron Phillips.

The Technical Advisory Committee on the other hand is much smaller and is meant to have members with a technical background in aviation, airports and the FAA. Members of that committee include Mike Duggan the airport advisory board president, Travis Biggs airport manager, Barry Hancock a commercial operator at the airport, and Tony Kohler the city’s planning and zoning director.

Biggs outlined the costs of the master plan update.

“The FAA pays for 90.63% the state pays for 6.6% and we pay for the other4.685%,” Biggs said. “So, our costs will be $27,781 which has been included in the budget.”

The council unanimously approved the execution of the grant agreement with the FAA to fund the majority of the Airport Master Plan Update.

Read the original story at KPCW.org

Heber Valley Artisan Cheese held their 2nd annual Ice Sculptures Exhibition this weekend. Several local businesses sponsored the sculptures being displayed. There were also two different ice carving demonstrations. The event was free to the public.

The annual event began last year when Carolee Kohler saw ice sculpting on a Hallmark movie and thought it would be a fun idea for their farm. They are also considering a woodcarving event.

According to Lindsey Strother, social media and events coordinator, each sculpture takes between 1-3 hours to carve. “We contacted Amazing Ice Creations back in November, and we reached out to local companies to sponsor the ice sculptures,” she said. “Yesterday morning around 9 am, they came in a massive truck and dropped them all off for us, and we set them up.”

Along with the ice sculptures, sponsors receive a sign and canopy for the display and social media marketing. The sponsors decide what they want to have sculpted. After the event, they can take the ice sculptures and display them at their businesses. The creations normally last a couple of weeks. Some will be left in the field and can be viewed throughout the week.

The ice this year included Olaf, company logos, animals, and other items. Darron Kingston, the sculptor, has carved ice for over 10 years with his dad. According to Kingston, “I like sculptures that give me a challenge. Here, for example, my favorite was the lumberjack.” One of his favorite past creations was a 9-foot bear.

Grant Kohler, owner of Heber Valley Artisan Cheese, explained, “We decided to do something that was free and something that people could just get out and come and enjoy. Especially this year with Covid, it seems like Januarys are slow months. People are looking for things to be able to get outside and do.” He continued, “Businesses pay in and buy the sculptures, we have them sculpted, and then we just let people come and enjoy them.” Kohler estimated around 3,000 to 4,000 people will stop by the event.

The dairy farm also offers cheese-making classes and tours of their new robotic barn. “The tours are everyday except Sunday,” according to Kohler. “People hayride over, intermingle with the cows, see the barn and amenities, and watch the cows be milked. The cows will literally go get milked on their own.” Tickets for the tours and other events are available on the Heber Valley Artisan Cheese website: https://hebervalleyartisancheese.com/.